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Archive for the 'Books' Category

The Gum Thief by Douglas Coupland

I have been a fan of Douglas Coupland's writings since reading "Generation X" many years ago. "Microserfs" is one of my all-time favorite books - among other qualities the book constitutes what is probably one of the best descriptions of geekyness. that has ever been put in writing.

I just found out (a little late) that Coupland released his latest book - "The Gum Thief" - in early October this year. I found out because I came across a collection of short video teasers for the book on YouTube. The videos are sort of »artsy« in the way they are made and I find them rather intriguing.

Check out this first clip:

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Currently Reading…

Camilla Stockmann & Maise Njor: "Michael Laudrups Tænder".

A re-read of "Snowcrash" by Neal Stephenson.

"Hooking Up", a collection of essays by Tom Wolfe. My personal favorite in the collection is the piece "Two Young Men Who Went West", which tells the tale of Robert Noyce and the start up of Intel (and subsequently Silicon Valley).

Morten Ramsland: "HundeHoved" - transcript of an interview with the author.

Thomas Rendell Curran: Thomas Rendell Curran: "The Rossiter File".

En korrespondance  Snow Crash  Essay Collection  Hundehoved  An inspector Stride Mystery

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Currently Reading…

In "The Closers" by Michael Connelly, Hieronymus Bosch returns from retirement to team up with former partner Kiz Rider at the Open-Unsolved Unit. In style, the first case assigned to Bosch and Rider comes laden with political implications ("high jingo"), which all trace to the dark underbelly of the LAPD. An excerpt is available at the author's website and the publisher provides an audio clip.

Professor emeritus David Favrholdt describes in his book, "Spaltningen", the relationship between nuclear physicists Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, and attempts to cast some light on their meeting in Copenhagen, september 1941. Did Heisenberg try to warn Bohr about the german atom bomb project, did he want to show off his success to his mentor and teacher, did he want to convince Bohr that no physicist should partake in making the atom bomb or did he attempt to recruit Bohr for the german project? Prof. Favrholdt will be holding a lecture series on the book's subject and the Danish Broadcasting Corporation - DR - have a radio program.

E. H. Gombrich: "A Little History of the World". The history of the world in 40 brief chapters. Review by the Observer. BBC radio interview with Gombrich's granddaughter about the book. On a curios note, I discovered that Gombrich reviewed a book about J. J. Gibson's theory to visual perception for the New York Times in 1989. As an integral part of his theory of perception, Gibson invented the concept of affordance.

Harry Bosch unpulls the plug   Bohr and Heisenberg   The history of the world in 40 brief chapters

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Currently Reading…

Neal Stephenson: "The Order of the World" - the 3rd part of the baroque cycle triology.

Douglas Coupland, "Life After God".

"Scottish Commander" by Peter Reese.

Michael Connelly, "The Poet". Do visit Connelly's website which contains interesting bits and pieces, including an interview with Harry Bosch and "lost" chapters from The Last Coyote and Angels Flight.

Anthony Swofford's "Jarhead" - now a motion picture!

"A Short History of Nearly Everything" by Bill Bryson: How did we get here?

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Currently Reading…

"The Confusion" - The Baroque Cycle, Vol. 2 - by Neal Stephenson, "Løgnhalsen fra Umbrien" af Bjarne Reuter.

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Gershenfeld: FAB

Reading a post on John Thackara's new book, "In the Bubble: Daily Life as a Design Opportunity" in Alex Pang's blog, I came across a post about Neil Gershenfeld's book "FAB: Personal Fabrication". This seems to be a really interesting book - in Neal Stephenson Diamon Age / feed line sort of sense. A few years back I read "When Things Start To Think". Here is a link to a review at Businessweek review.

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